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Sacroiliac Joint Disease (SI Joint Disease)

Sacroiliac joint (SI joint) disease or dysfunction can cause patients to experience severe and chronic lower back, hip and leg pain. Located at the base of the spine, the sacroiliac joints connects the sacrum to the pelvis. When these joints becomes inflamed or irritated patients may experience severe pain. When this occurs, patients often seek medical attention and sacroiliac joint disease or sacroiliac joint dysfunction is often diagnosed.

What Causes Sacroiliac joint disease?

SI joint disease is caused when the Sacroiliac joint becomes inflamed or irritated. This inflammation can be caused by under-activity, over-activity, injury or degeneration, like arthritis of the spine.

Sacroiliac joint disease Symptoms

Sacroiliac joint disease often causes patients to experience chronic, radiating pain and loss of motion. Some of the symptoms associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction, and commonly treated by minimally invasive procedures at the Minimally Invasive Spine Institute, include:

  • Pain in lower back
  • Pain while sleeping or sitting on your side
  • Pain while climbing stairs or sitting and standing
  • Pain in the buttocks or hip
  • Tingling in legs
  • Numbness in legs
  • Inability to sit or stand for long periods of time
  • Radiating pain
  • Localized pain

The MISI Approach to Treating Sacroiliac Joint Disease

Before recommending surgery, we always urge our patients to explore available conservative treatments for sacroiliac joint disease. Treatments such as massage therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic care, injection therapy and low-impact exercise may be able to bring you relief from your moderate symptoms. However, if these fail to bring you the level of lasting relief that you deserve, you may be a candidate for a minimally invasive surgery at the Minimally Invasive Spine Institute.

Contact Us

Contact us today for a no cost MRI review to determine whether you may be a candidate for a minimally invasive procedure to treat your sacroiliac joint disease or dysfunction at the Minimally Invasive Spine Institute.